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Antique tsumugi silk w/ woven cross and swastika pattern

£10.00 £7.50

Antique tsumugi silk w/ woven cross and swastika pattern

14 in stock

SKU: 0023 Category: Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Description

Antique tsumugi silk w/ woven cross and swastika pattern

This amazing material is a crazy interlocking cross and swastika weave, in a very lovely, slubby nubbly tsumugi silk that has acres of character and charm. It comes from an unused bolt of fabric that was intended for a matching kimono and haori short jacket. It is antique (pre 1960), in excellent condition and is a medium weight material with a nice drape, firm texture that is at the same time soft and comfortable. It is a blend of black, blue, white and just a touch of pale yellow colors that really make for an appealing look.

The roll is 35 cm wide and you would be purchasing it in 1 meter increments. If you order more than one meter, it will come to you in one piece.

 Swastika: In South Asia, the swastika is omnipresent as a symbol of wealth and good fortune. It is used as a religious symbol in Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism, which can be traced to pre-modern traditions. In the Sinosphere, countries and regions that were historically influenced by the culture of China, such as Taiwan, Japan, Hong Kong, Korea, Vietnam, Singapore and China itself, the symbol is most commonly associated with Buddhism. They are commonly found in Buddhist temples, religious artifacts, texts related to Buddhism and schools founded by Buddhist religious groups.

Tsumugi: A silk textile woven with hand-spun threads from wild silk cocoon fibres. It doesn’t have a glossy or smooth texture, but a tasteful rough texture. Very time consuming to produce, as the silk fibre has to be joined repeatedly, due to the hole in the cocoon where the silk moth exited, so a very expensive silk. (Also see hige-tsumugi)

Additional information

Weight 0.25 kg
Dimensions 100 × 35 cm

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